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Photos author is Alexander Lytvyn

Panorama of the Dnipro, the Bridge of Kisses

Concerning with the sight:

Panorama of the Dnipro, the Bridge of Kisses

Kyiv landscapes could not fail to arouse admiration for the picturesque panoramas. The fashion for admiring the view spread in the late 18th century. Then it was a kind of art, because it is not enough to admire the landscape – a true connoisseur is also immersed in a certain mood. Among the connoisseurs of Kyiv vistas were historians Mykhailo Maksymovych and Volodymyr Antonovych, writer Ivan Nechui-Levytskyi, and philologist Pavlo Zhytetskyi. Photographers, too, did not pass panoramas in Kyiv: as early as the 1860s, Dmytro Birkin and Hryhorii Chugaievych published albums with views of Kyiv. Today, admiring the scenery is no less popular, but the availability of photography and the development of social networks have made this activity more dynamic.

In the 19th century, the list of places from where one could enjoy the best views of Kyiv, included the crossing of the Dnipro opposite the Lavra, the porch of St. Andrew’s Church, the slopes of the Old Kyiv Hill, the observation deck of the Tsarsky Garden (now Kreschatyi Park and the City Garden). It is noteworthy that from all those points one can see the Dnipro.

Since the city itself originated on the river, its image is associated with antiquity, past history, and the passage of time in general. This association was facilitated by the fact that Dnipro-Slavuta is mentioned in The Tale of the Armament of Igor. In Pavlo Tychyna’s poem Golden Rumble ‘there moor the golden boats / from gray antiquity,’ and from them comes St. Andrew, the apostle, who, according to legend, predicted that a city with many churches would appear here. The living connection of the Dnipro with the past is not lost in the Ukrainian poetry of the 20th century: ‘The night Dnipro sighed through an old man’s dream…’ (Maksym Rylskyi), ‘The Dnipro did not flow away, strangely enough. Water flows away. Life flows away’ (Taras Fedyuk), ‘Is this the Dnipro? Or the Danube? Or the cold and turbid Lethe?’ (Ihor Rymaruk).

The Bridge of Kisses emerged in the 2000s, and it meets the usual requirements for the point of view of Kyiv vistas – a wonderful panorama of the Dnipro and the Left Bank. From the bridge, you can also see the domes of the Lavra, and the Church of the Savior in Berestov, and the terrace of the Park of Eternal Glory, which was opened in 1957 on the site of the former Anosivskyi Garden (established in 1894). On the opposite side of the bridge, on the site where the Salyut Hotel is now located, stood the Military St. Nicholas Cathedral. This church, exemplary of Ukrainian Baroque forms, was built according to the project of architect Osyp Startsev at Mazepa’s expense in 1690-1696. The cathedral was demolished by the Bolsheviks in 1935.

Another historical place near the Kissing Bridge is the Askold’s Tomb. In the Ukrainian culture of the 20th century, it is primarily associated with the burial of participants in the battle of Kruty (1918). The alley under the Bridge of Kisses is also named after the Heroes of Kruty.

Concerning with the sight: