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Photos author is Alexander Lytvyn

St. Volodymyr’s Monument, Volodymyr’s Hill

Concerning with the sight:

St. Volodymyr’s Monument, Volodymyr’s Hill

The monument to Prince Volodymyr the Great on the Dnipro cliff has been one of Kyiv’s visiting cards for over a hundred years.

The hill was originally named after St. Michael, because it belonged to St. Michael’s Golden-Domed Monastery, which stood there since the 12th century. When the mountain was transferred to the city, a garden was laid out on the slopes, and in the 1830s and 1840s the idea arose to build a monument to the Baptist of Rus: this monument, the first in Kyiv, was to become the dominant part of the park ensemble. The monument was created by sculptors Vasyl Demut-Malynovskyi and Petro Klodt and architect Oleksandr Ton. In St. Petersburg, a 4.5-meter-tall figure was cast from bronze and mounted on a 16-meter pedestal decorated with bas-reliefs. The sculpture rises to 70 m above the level of the Dnipro. The monument was opened in 1853, and in 1888 the cross was illuminated with light bulbs. It still looks very impressive, and in those days really impressed both Kyivites and guests of the city.

On the lower terrace of Volodymyr’s Hill there is a road from Khreshchatyk to Podil, in the middle there is a monument to Volodymyr, from which stretches a boulevard with poplars, and the upper terrace is a large observation deck: in 1870, a metal pavilion appeared here. In 1887, the only free park in Kyiv was taken care of by a commission headed by Kyiv architect Volodymyr Nikolaiev: boulevards were planted, flower beds were arranged, and in 1898, the famous Kokorev pavilions were built, named after the industrialist Vasyl Kokorev, who, after visiting Kyiv in the 1860s, was so impressed by the panorama of the Dnipro that he allocated funds for the construction of the pavilions.

Volodymyr’s Hill is one of the most famous and favorite urban locations, both in the 19th century and today. From here one may enjoy a wonderful panorama of the Dnipro, the Left Bank, and Podil.

Concerning with the sight: