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Photos author is Alexander Lytvyn

Mykhailivska Street

Concerning with the sight:

Mykhailivska Street

As with many streets near St. Sophia Cathedral and St. Michael’s Monastery, the history of Mykhailivska Street dates back to the days of Kyiv Rus. The street led from the Liadski Gate (on the territory of the modern Maidan Nezalezhnosti) to St. Michael’s Cathedral – so it has existed at least since the 12th century. The street with this name is mentioned in documents of 1799.

The current buildings on Mykhailivska Street date mainly to the last third of the 19th century, and since the street was of the first category, only stone houses two-storey and higher were allowed to be built there.

Mykhailivska Street has been associated with various cultural events and figures since the 19th century. The house, on the site of the modern Kozatskyi Hotel, housed artist and photographer Ivan Gudovskyi, who hosted Taras Shevchenko. In the house № 12, in January 1874, during a tour in Kyiv, Hungarian composer Ferenc Liszt met his colleagues Jósef Witwicki and Alois Panocini. In 1893–1895, Stanisław Blumenfeld Music School was located at №16a Mykhailivska Street, where Mykola Lysenko taught piano and rehearsed the choir. In 1906, the editorial offices of the first Ukrainian-language magazines of the Empire, Nova Hromada and Hromadska Dumka, settled in №10.

In Soviet times, Mykhailivska Street bore the name of the Paris Commune (1922–1991), and people called it simply Parkomuny. In №12a a squat appeared in the early 1990s. In 1990–1994, Ukrainian artists Oleksandr Hnylytskyi, Oleh Holosiy, Yuriy Solomko, Valeria Trubina, Vasyl Tsagolov, and others gathered in the Parkomuny squat. Squat became the prototype of modern art centers: there they communicated, worked, made performances, watched movies, organized parties. It was not an artistic union with a manifesto and program – on the contrary, the artists emphasized their anti-systemic and counterculture attitudes clearly characterizing the atmosphere of the first years of Ukrainian independence. (In the 1990s, there were other squats in Kyiv, for example, on Olehivska Street or BZ-Art on Velyka Zhytomyrska Street.)

Concerning with the sight: