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Photos author is Alexander Lytvyn

Bulvarno-Kudriavska Street, Lviv Square

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Bulvarno-Kudriavska Street, Lviv Square

Like most streets and squares of Old Kyiv, this area bears historical and cultural layers. Bulvarno-Kudriavska Street originated in the 1830s, and received its name due to the fact it connected Bulvarna Street (now Taras Shevchenko Boulevard) with Kudriavets area.

Bulvarno-Kudriavska Street and the nearby Lviv Square are associated with art. Since 1902, the Kyiv Art School, which taught classics of Ukrainian painting – Mykola Pymonenko, Oleksandr Murashko, and Fedir Krychevskyi – has been located at 2 Bulvarno-Kudriavska Street. Nearby, on the Voznesenskyi Descent, one may find the Academy of Arts, and on the square – the House of Artists.

Lviv Square has been known since Kyiv Rus period. It got its name from the Lviv Gate of the Old Kyiv Fortress, leading from Kyiv to the west. The square was formed here when the gate was demolished in the middle of the 19th century.

One of the well-known buildings of the Soviet era near Lviv Square was the Sinnyi Market. It was built in Bulvarno-Kudriavska Street (then Vorovsky) in 1958, and finally demolished in 2005. The market gained popularity among city folk not least due to traders in imported goods, which were difficult to obtain in the USSR.

Since Ukraine gained independence, Lviv Square has received another specific attribute. In 1991, the construction of the Kyiv Metro station Lvivska Brama began here, and it was to receive the first passengers in 1996. Ironically, it was in that year that all work was frozen at the station. And still between the stations Golden Gate and Lukianivska there is a huge passage and the platform of the unfinished station. There is no free space for the construction of the lobby and exit from the subway due to the surrounding buildings. So, Lvivska Brama is ripe with stories about ghosts and other mystical entities. In the parable Lviv Gate by Oleksandr Irvanets from Ochamymria (2003), this metro station turned out to be the portal through which the hero from Kyiv got to Lviv.

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